Posted by: Jeff Nelson on Apr 27, 2018 7:42:00 AM

The metal manufacturing process your part or component goes through is going to depend on the specifics of your need. We’re a multifaceted metal manufacturer, meaning we have multiple ways to make a part. We have comprehensive equipment, and we have highly-skilled employees who aren’t just metal fabricators – they’re problem solvers.

Our capabilities are multi-level and complex. We offer four primary services that are all performed in-house:

We’re able to take our customers from prototype to production and use many different types of machinery to create the part they need.

Prototype

R&M's In-House Metal Manufacturing ProcessA lot of the parts we make for our customers start out as a prototype. Whether they worked with our design and engineering department or had something drawn up on their end, we’re going to review the design for metal fabrication best practices and build out the prototype.

Prototype Testing

Prototypes might be made using laser cutting, brake forming, or some other special tools, and they are hand-loaded from operation to operation. After a few parts are made, they’re put through testing. The test results show us any areas where improvements can be made, and we make another round of prototypes. This process can repeat as many times as it takes to get parts with the right qualities.

Production

Once a prototype has the qualities and capabilities it needs, we’ll do a small production run. These components are fabricated using short-run stamping, and they are sent to the customer for approval. The customer will usually approve the component or request additional changes. Once we have customer approval, we can start producing their component on whatever scale they require.

Short-Run or Long-Run Stamping

For customers who are unsure whether their sheet metal component is better suited for short-run or long-run stamping, we’re more than happy to walk them through the different variables that impact their decision.

More often than not, the decision comes down to the number of components to be created, the longevity of the need for a component, how quickly a customer wants to be able to go from order to shipment, and maybe a few other variables that would be specific to their project needs. If you’re interested in making a concept for a component into a reality, request a quote:  

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Jeff Nelson

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